BANNER
The Monthly Newsletter of the University of Technology, Jamaica Vol. XIV Issue 5 - May 2010

59 Coaches Graduate from the UTech Coaching School

Graduates of the UTech/JFF Advanced Level II Coaching Course pose for a group photo at their Graduation Ceremony held on Tuesday, May 11, 2010 at the Faculty of Science and Sport Building.Sharing in moment seated from left are Dr. Heather Little-White, Mr. Horace Reid, Prof. the Hon. Errol Morrison, OJ, President, UTech, Captain Horace Burrell, President, Jamaica Football Federation (JFF), Ms. Patricia Sutherland, Executive Director, Business Operations and Group Strategy, Jamaica Money Market Brokers and Dr. Colin Gyles, Dean of the Faculty of Science and Sport.

Fifty Nine football coaches received their certification to coach at the local and international levels at the graduation ceremony for the UTech/JFF/JMMB Advanced Level II Football Coaching course held on Tuesday, May 11, 2010 at the UTech Papine Campus. The Coaching course which was conducted in February in Montego Bay and Kingston was delivered in collaboration with football’s world governing body, FIFA.

Captain Horace Burrell, President of the Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) in his remarks said that he was proud of what we had been achieved. “I think that we as Jamaicans have continued to set the trend.” He said that FIFA had expressed total satisfaction in what they had seen. They visited the training school and examined the curriculum. “They have gone back to Zurich examining this and will implement it as a part of their curriculum for other countries around the world. ”Prof. the Hon. Errol Morrison, President, UTech in congratulating the graduates, welcomed them as alumni of the University and encouraged them to pursue further studies at UTech in the area of Sports Sciences or other areas of interest. The new Bachelor of Science degree in Sports Sciences offered by the Faculty of Science and Sport will commence in September 2010. It has been designed to provide hands-on practical experience for practitioners in various areas of sport and will be delivered over four years on a full-time basis. Students will have the opportunity to choose from three exciting options for specialization in the Art and Science of Coaching; Sports Management and Sports Athletic Training (Sport Physiotherapy and Conditioning).

Of the 61 participating coaches, which included two females and approximately fifteen former national players, fifty-nine were awarded Certificates of Achievement having completed all the modules of the course, Coaching Sciences and Technical Development and Analysis.

 

Mr. Fabian Davis (left), former national player, accepts his Certificate of Completion from Prof. the Hon. Errol Morrison, OJ, President.
Mr. Karume Huie, accepts his Certificate of Completion from Ms. Patricia Sutherland, Executive Director, Business Operations & Group Strategy of Jamaica Money Market Brokers (JMMB).
Mr. Onandi Lowe (left), former national player, accepts his Certificate of Completion from Captain Horace Burrell, President, Jamaica Football Federation (JFF).

UTech Offers First BSc in Occupational Health and Safety in the Region

The Government of Jamaica Occupational Health and Safety Act (2002) mandates all industries to establish and comply with occupational health and safety measures as legislated. In support of needed academic training in this area and in keeping with international standards set by the World Health Organisation for occupational health and safety, the College of Health Sciences, University of Technology, Jamaica (UTech) will offer the new Bachelor of Science in Occupational Health and Safety beginning at the start of the academic year in September 2010. The course is the first its kind in the Caribbean region and complements the College’s degree programme in Environmental Health

The B.Sc. in Occupational Health and Safety will train specialists to oversee healthy and safe work environments and enforce environmental regulations consistent with occupational health and safety needs. Graduates of the course of study will be qualified for needed professionals as Safety Officers, Occupational Hygienists, Occupational Health professionals and Environmental Safety Officers or jobs in related areas in the public and private sectors in the region.

The course is four years of full time study and eligible applicants must have five passes at G.C.E. O’ level with grades A, B or C or Caribbean Secondary examination CSEC Levels 1, 2, 3 (as of June 1998) in English Language, Mathematics, Biology/Human Social, Chemistry and one other pass in an approved subject.

Application for this programme is currently open. For further information, interested applicants may contact Mrs. Audrey Hussey, Programme Director at telephone 948-9057 or email: ehussey@utech.edu.jm.


Successful Assessment of UTech 2nd MBA Cohort

Dr Neville Swaby (centre) head of the UTech/JIM School of Advanced Management pose with MBA students.

The second cohort of the UTech Master of Business Administration degree programme culminated their intense 18 month modular programme on a high note on May 29 – 30, 2010 with final presentations and assessment of their student projects prepared for the Business Policy and Strategic Case Study Analysis component of the course of study.  The assignment involves the identification of a problem within a company and development of strategies to deal with the problems facing the company.

The assessors which included a panel of senior faculty from overseas universities, senior business professionals from local organization and senior faculty form UTech had high ratings for the student presentations and their professional approach. The presentations were made at the Breezes Runaway Bay Hotel, St. Ann.

Dr Neville Swaby, Head of the UTech/JIM School of Advanced Management and chief architect of its MBA programme explained that, “The exercise is designed to effectively groom students in applied research.  This is a practical and effective way of exposing them to research and consultancy.” Dr Gavin Chen, Dean, UTech’s College of Business and Management is also pleased with the progress in the School of Advanced Management.  He noted that, “this rigour and sophistication is designed to adequately prepare the students for the working world and position the UTech MBA above its competitors.” 

Over 100 students participated in the assessment.

 

Some members of the assessment panel at right listen to a presentation by a group of MBA students.

 

UTech is currently building its research capacity and has a strong focus on applied research.  The University’s focus is in keeping with its commitment to support national development by providing the required skill set for the job market and directly engaging in business consultancy to various organizations.


MBA Students pose for the camera following their final research paper presentations.

HIGHLIGHTING EXCELLENCE

DR. AMANI ISHEMO RECEIVES HIGHLY COMMENDED AWARD FOR PUBLICATION

Dr. Amani Ishemo’s article, “Vulnerability of Coastal Urban Settlements in Jamaica ”, published in Journal Management of Environmental Quality, has been chosen for a Highly Commended Award at the Emerald Literati Network Awards for Excellence 2010.

The award winning papers are chosen following consultation amongst the journal’s Editorial Team, many of whom are eminent academics or managers. Dr. Ishemo’s paper was selected as it was one of most impressive pieces of work the team has seen throughout 2009.

The Article examines the impact of rapid urbanization, poverty and institutional incapacity on coastal urban settlements (see abstract below).

Abstract

Purpose - This paper seeks to examine the issue of vulnerability of coastal urban settlements in Jamaica in the context of rapid urbanization, poverty and institutional incapacity. It also provides a case study that demonstrates the precarious situation faced by the most vulnerable coastal urban communities in Jamaica .

Design/Methodology/Approach – A literature review preceded in-depth but informal interviews with the directors of planning of the cities of Kingston, Port Antonio and Port Maria on a variety of issues related to hazards in conjunction with their municipal operational capacities. Informal interviews were also carried out with a community leader and five more persons who have resided in the African Gardens community since its inception in the 1980’s. Interviews were based on issues such as hazards, government involvement in the development of the site and demographic characteristics of the area. Archival information on the Hope River corridor was also utilized to enhance the understanding of the site specific hazard issues in relation to the surrounding environment. The field verification which was carried out in September 2008, updated the 1994 topographic map of the area at a scale of 1:5000.

Findings – The result of the findings suggested that the conditions for the vulnerability of coastal towns in Jamaica are overwhelmingly man–made. The problems of vulnerability have been worsened by the incapacity of the central and local governments in terms of their limitations of financial and technical resources, and the lack of government sensitivity to tackle the issue in a sustainable approach.

Originality/Value– The matter of vulnerability of coastal urban settlements is a complex settlement problem of Jamaica ’s entire landscape. The solution to this problem requires an integrated and long term action program regardless of the political party in power.

Keywords: Vulnerability, Coastal Towns, Urbanization, Poverty, Institutional Incapacity

Article Type: Research Paper

Dr. Amani Ishemo is a Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of the Built Environment. His main research and teaching interests lie in small scale development strategies, rural development and natural hazard management. He is one of the advisors to the Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management (ODPEM) on a project, “Natural hazard Management in Urban Coastal areas of Jamaica ”. He is also one of the researchers on a European Union project, “Reinforcing the Caribbean Islands’ Capacity to Face Risks”.

The School of Graduate Studies, Research and Entrepreneurship congratulates Dr. Ishemo for this commendation, which is evident of the University’s continued excellence in scholarly work.  

 


WHY IT IS A GOOD TIME TO INVEST IN RENEWABLE ENERGY?

By Owen Gunning

Owen Gunning, P.E., CEM, CEA, CDSM

Director of Engineering - Computing and Engineering Entrepreneurial Centre, UTech and President of the Jamaica Society of Energy Engineers

Within the last year three factors have evolved that have made investments in renewable energy economical and environmentally rewarding.

  1. The price of a kilowatt hour (KWh) of electricity has increased to as high as J$34 albeit with help from a 10% GCT imposition.
  2. The cost of renewable energy equipment in particular solar photovoltaic (PV) cells and wind turbine have fallen substantially.Whereas a year ago the cost of installed PV was in excess of US$7 per watt, that cost has fallen below US$2.80.
  3. Imposition of tighter guidelines for greenhouse gasses and carbon emissions by European countries and the USA have driven up the cost and importance of carbon credit.Carbon credit has now become a tradable commodity on the world market.
    Many companies in these countries unable to replace equipment and processes over the short term are forced to purchase carbon credit from countries that are not yet up to their limit.Countries like Jamaica can therefore benefit from the installation of renewable energy in three ways
    1. Lower price of electricity to consumers
    2. A cleaner and friendlier environment
    3. Savings in foreign exchange. For example a 2.0 MW renewable plant if operating at full capacity saves the country from purchasing 13,774 barrels of crude oil per year.At US$75 per barrel this amounts to US$1,033,045.

For most consumers however the most compelling reason is the improvement in the bottom line or increased disposable income to consumers.

Table 1 shows a matrix of costs versus savings for various size installations of photovoltaic cells.

Comparison of using Solar PV panels vs. JPS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JPS Rate

10

10

20

40

40

50

Solar PV Panel:

 

 

 

 

 

 

No of panels

5

15

100

250

500

                  5,000

PV panels combined capacity rating (KW)

                1.0

              3.0

              20.0

              50.0

            100.0

                1,000.0

CIF Cost of PV panels per Watt (USD)

 USD       2.79

            2.79

              2.79

              2.79

              2.79

                    2.79

Supplier mark-up

20%

20%

30%

20%

20%

20%

Retail price of PV panels per watt (USD)

              3.35

            3.35

              3.63

              3.35

              3.35

                    3.35

Exchange rate

90

90

90

90

90

90

Retail price of PV panels per watt (JMD)

 J$     301,320

 J$   903,960

 J$  6,528,600

 J$15,066,000

 J$30,132,000

 J$    301,320,000

Installation cost

 J$       30,132

 J$     90,396

 J$     652,860

 J$  1,506,600

 J$  3,013,200

 J$      30,132,000

Supply and installation cost of system

 J$     331,452

 J$   994,356

 J$  7,181,460

 J$16,572,600

 J$33,145,200

 J$    331,452,000

Interest rate

8%

8%

8%

8%

8%

8%

Life of PV Panels (yrs)

15

15

15

15

15

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Monthly Payments on a loan to purchase Solar PV panel

J$3,167.53

J$9,502.58

J$68,629.77

J$158,376.40

J$316,752.79

J$2,772,397

Monthly Pmts after 1yr moratorium to install system

J$3,420.93

J$10,262.79

J$74,120.15

J$171,046.51

J$342,093.02

J$2,994,189

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating expense:

 

 

 

 

 

 

          Maintenance cost monthly (1/12 %)

           251.10

         753.30

        5,440.50

      12,555.00

      25,110.00

          251,100.00

          Insurance cost monthly (1/24 %)

           125.55

         376.65

        2,720.25

        6,277.50

      12,555.00

          125,550.00

          Total operating costs

           376.65

      1,129.95

        8,160.75

      18,832.50

      37,665.00

 376,650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total operating and financing costs

J$3,544.18

J$10,632.53

J$76,790.52

J$177,208.90

J$354,417.79

J$3,149,047

Total operating and financing costs after 1 yr Moratorium

J$3,797.58

J$11,392.74

J$82,280.90

J$189,879.01

J$379,758.02

J$3,370,839

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JPS Electricity cost:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumption (kWh)

               150

             450

            3,000

            7,500

           15,000

               150,000

Fuel & IPP Charges

16.686

16.686

16.686

16.686

16.686

16.686

Energy rate (0-100 kWh)

6.19

6.19

6.19

3.42

3.42

3.42

Energy rate (>100 kWh)

14.15

14.15

14.15

3.42

3.42

3.42

Base F/E rate

89

89

89

89

89

89

Billing F/E rate

89.75

89.75

89.75

89.75

89.75

89.75

GCT rate

10%

10%

10%

10%

10%

10%

Total electricity bill

        3,830.04

    14,031.34

    101,978.01

         236,011

         472,021

            4,549,781

Cost per kWh (J$/kWh)

25.53

31.18

33.99

31.47

31.47

30.33

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photovoltaic Cells:

 

 

 

 

 

 

No of hours of sunshine per day

5

5

5

5

5

5

No days per month

30

30

30

30

30

30

Monthly kWh Saved using Solar PV

               150

             450

            3,000

            7,500

           15,000

               150,000

Maximum Consumption (kWh)

 

 

 

 

 

               568,000

Total monthly saving using Solar PV

 J$    3,830.04

         14,031

         101,978

         236,011

         472,021

            4,549,781

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total 

 J$    3,830.04

 J$    14,031

 J$    101,978

 J$    236,011

 J$    472,021

 J$        4,549,781

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net savings

 J$      285.86

 J$  3,398.81

 J$  25,187.49

 J$  58,801.73

 J$117,603.46

 J$   1,400,733

Net savings if 1 yr Moratorium is exercised for install

 J$        32.46

 J$  2,638.60

 J$  19,697.11

 J$  46,131.62

 J$  92,263.23

 J$   1,178,942

Carbon Credit (US$ 5.00 per KW)

 

 

 

 

 

 J$        37,500.00

Total savings

 

 

 

 

 

 J$   1,438,233

Total savings if 1 yr Moratorium is exercised

 

 

 

 

 

 J$   1,216,442

Payback (yrs) using borrowed money

97

24

24

23

23

17.9

Payback (yrs) using my money

8.0

6.4

6.4

6.4

6.4

6.6

Return on Investment (ROI)

1.03%

4.10%

4.21%

4.26%

4.26%

5.07%

Required area (sq ft)

               100

             300

            2,000

            5,000

           10,000

               100,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Even lower level consumers who benefit from lower rate for the first 100 KWh and no GCT for the first 200 KWh would have a net saving, albeit small.The savings increase as consumption increases.

This analysis takes into account;

  1. A 20% mark-up on CIF prices for suppliers
  2. A further 10% of retail cost for installation
  3. Insurance and maintenance costs.

From the table it shows that a consumer installing fifteen panels or 3000 watt which is sufficient to run most medium size houses, needs to borrow J$994,000.Your monthly loan payment and operating costs will be J$10,632.  Your monthly electricity bill using the equivalent power to the PV output (450 KWh) is J$14,031.You will therefore save J$3,398.81 per month.

PAYBACK

Although the calculated payback is high, particularly when using borrowed money it is very attractive using your own money.  Using your own money means that you loses the opportunity cost.

Although the Payback method is still widely used, most financial analysis of a project uses the Net Present Value method because it takes into account the time value of money which the payback method does not do.

To put in layman’s term, if you budget the same amount of money for electricity in this case J$14,031, you could install the system, pay your monthly loan payment of J$9,502 and still have J$3,398 leftover to drink with your friends.

Another benefit is that you are almost independent of JPS.  I say almost, because your On Grid Circuit breaker or Grid tie system will take any additional power required from JPS in instances where you are exceeding the capacity of your PV system or in instances when the sun is absent for a protracted length of time.  Most persons I know who have installed a PV or wind turbine system use less than 30 KWh per month.

IS GOVERNMENT DOING ENOUGH TO PROMOTE THE USE OF RENEWABLE ENERGY?

From where I sit I would say hardly.  The government has two schemes available to assist consumers and SME’s. The two are

  1. The NHT assistance program which lends J$120,000 for solar water heater and J$1.2 M for persons installing a photovoltaic system.The process to get the money is a long and tedious one and most persons will give up half way through the process.
  2. The second is the DBJ-PetroCaribe line of credit for SME’s, a fund available to SME’s wishing to improve their operations through the implementation of energy saving measures and installation of renewable energy equipment. 

    DBJ does not lend directly to consumers but through a network of Approved Financial Institutions (AFI).The AFI’s have the responsibility to do the due diligence on applicants and take most if not all the risks.They therefore request higher spread to mitigate against this risk.  The current offering is around 12% a spread of maybe 6 or 7%.

Easier access will have to be made to these funds in the same way banks lend to persons borrowing money to purchase motor cars.  Persons wishing to participate in the project and who are willing to arrange salary deductions should be fast tracked and approved within a two weeks period.

Government needs to go beyond lip service and truly get things moving.If consumers could be encouraged to invest 10% of the current demand of 750 MW, this would be equivalent to a national saving of approximately US$37 M money which the Government would not need to find to purchase crude oil.

You may send comments to ogunning@utech.edu.jm or visit the JSEE website at www.jsee.org.jm


BUILDING A NEW POLITICAL ARCHITECTURE IN JAMAICA

Contributed by Prof. Rosalea Hamilton, Vice President, Development, UTech and President, The MSME Alliance

Story come to bump!!! For far too long, we have witnessed or participated (directly or indirectly) in a decaying political system that has contributed to the current crisis facing our country. Unable or unwilling to address the well-known political problems, it took the US request for the extradition of 'Dudus' for things to start falling apart.The good news is that there seem to be a national resolve to fix the underlying problems that have brought our country into disrepute. We seem ready to build a new political architecture!!!

But what will it take? Is there consensus on these underlying problems? How will we fix them?

For many, the core problem is corrupt politicians who perpetuate an unholy alliance between political parties and criminality and THEY must change. As the main beneficiaries of the status quo, do we really thing THEY will change? Instead, I suggest WE must change. I see “political apathy” among Jamaicans (young and old) as the major underlying problem that we must be fixed.It is expressed mainly by withdrawal from the political process.  Repeatedly, we hear Jamaicans (especially the middle class) say: “Politics is too dirty...mi nah get involved.” In the last three national elections, about half of the voting age population did not turn out to vote. With a voting age population of 1.6 million people, it is estimated that there are less than 100,000 registered (not necessarily active) members in the two major political parties.Political apathy is also expressed by many involved in the political process through their willingness to accept the political status quo and their sycophantic behaviour to ensure they are in good standing with the political leadership.

It is our collective political apathetic behaviours that have enabled and emboldened many politicians to carry out their inept and often corrupt practices aimed mainly at gaining or maintaining state power. This has also fostered the disconnection between the will of the people and the actions of politicians in the Executive and the Legislature. Prime Minister Golding, in his Swearing-In Address in September 2007, promised to improve governance by, among other things, thecurtailment of the powers of the Executive and the strengthening of Parliament, so that it can exert greater control over the government.This curtailment can only be meaningfully achieved with effective control over the government by the people. How do we achieve this?

We must actively build new civic institutions and strengthen existing ones that can influence executive and legislative decisions. An important lesson from the recent events is the strong voice of civil society, in collaboration with the media, in expressing dissatisfaction with the actions of the Prime Minister and others that brought our country into disrepute. The strong voices that influenced the chief Executive came from individuals who represent organizations that were created by the people not by government. Included among them was The MSME Alliance, an unprecedented network of 34 private sector organizations, representing more than 300,000 micro, small and medium sized enterprises (MSMEs) in Jamaica. The MSME Alliance, one of the four private sector representatives in the Partnership for Transformation (PFT), partnered in suspending the PFT talks and joined forces with other private sector organizations in the newly created “Presidents’ Council” in issuing a joint statement. It was historic! Never before have 64 private sector organizations issued a unified position on a matter of national importance.Among other things, there was agreement to take a proactive stance in monitoring and participating in activities to ensure that “the commitments made by the Prime Minister move beyond words to actual deliverables in a timely manner.”

This groundswell of reaction which contributed to the “attempted” resignation by the Prime Minister and a national apology must now be transformed into new or strengthened institutional arrangements that will drive the political and economic changes needed to build a new Jamaica. Decades ago, CLR James pointed out that when we build independent (civic) organizations and practice good governance, we develop an understanding of the rights and duties of democracy. He noted: “Democratic government does not create democracy. Democracy creates democratic government.” So it is our collective habits and practices of democratic behaviour that will be the main building blocks in creating the relevant political architecture of a new democratic Jamaica where, inter alia, Members of Parliament are accountable to the people they represent and not their Political Party/Party Leader.

A new democratic Jamaica will require us to actively participate in restructuring the existing political parties or building new political parties. In so doing, we will get the political party and, in turn, the government we want that truly reflects the will of the people.When we actively engage in the selection process of candidates within constituencies, we get the candidate that WE choose rather than an unknown candidate chosen for us by others. When we actively engage in shaping the party manifesto and monitoring its implementation, WE influence the policies and programmes of the party in power. When we actively engage in shaping the rules to regulate party activities and monitoring adherence to these rules, WE limit rogue behaviour and curtail convert activities such as those in the Trafigura or 'Dudus-Manatt' affairs. When we actively build a democratic party that executes the will of the members and not only the will of the party leadership, WE can build a democratic government under the control and direction of the people rather than special interest cabals.

For those not willing to confront the “rough and tumble” of party politics, actively participate in existing community organizations/non-governmental organizations (NGOs) or work with others in building a new one to address the issues of concern to your community. How many of us know about the Constituency Development Plan that seeks to develop the communities in which we live? How many of us know how the Constituency Development Funds are being spent? Through community-based organizations or NGOs, a new political architecture will require us to actively participate in the creation of the Plan and to monitor its implementation as well as financial and other resource allocation. At the national level, we must also actively monitor the implementation of the Vision 2030 Plan. Importantly, the new political architecture must make room for a participatory, sector-wide budgetary process that includes non-traditional economic actors. The process must facilitate bottom-up economic development that will put to work our idle young men and women, especially those in impoverished inner-cities and rural communities, and improve their odds of becoming productive citizens rather than hardened criminals. It is this new political architecture that is necessary to support the local capital-creating activities of MSMEs and enable them to unleash their entrepreneurial spirit and, in so doing, foster transformational growth and development.

In a recent Observer editorial (May 19), the Editor correctly noted that “...politics is too important to be left to politicians.” In building a fresh political architecture of a new Jamaica, every citizen (at home and abroad) must ask: how do I move from political apathy to a form of political activism (within and/or outside of political parties) that is transformative? It is our collective answer to this question that will determine the pace and the extent to which we can build a new political architecture for Jamaica that will prevent the reoccurrence of the tragic events currently unfolding before our eyes.

Email: rosaleahamilton@yahoo.com

 

WELCOME TO YOUR CAMPUS NEWSLETTER

Thank you for your tremendous and ongoing feedback on the UTech Communicator, your monthly campus newsletter. Do remember that this is your newsletter and should reflect your views. News and photographs on achievements, developments, upcoming and past events, and general interest articles are welcome from members of the university community.

We need you to help us improve the communication challenges at our dynamic institution and therefore crave your partnership in this regard. Let’s continue to keep the communication channels open and active.

 

Hector Wheeler
Director – Advancement
Development Division 
Tel: 512-2074
Fax:  977-9146
E-Mail: hwheeler@utech.edu.jm

Michelle Beckford
Corporate Communications Manager
Advancement Department
Development Division
Tel: 512-2299
Fax:  977-9146
E-Mail: mbeckford@utech.edu.jm